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Seventh Grade

Seventh Grade

BIBLE - PENTATEUCH AND HISTORY  

  • Students will gain an appreciation for the historical and cultural context of God’s holy word by sustained and disciplined inquiry into the early history of Israel as recorded in the Pentateuch, and the books of history: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, the books of Samuel, Kings as well as the works of Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther. 
  • Students will examine the Old Testament and covenantal background to the fulfillment of “the Law and the Prophets” in the coming of Jesus of Nazareth, the Son of God and promised Messiah, by doing the following: 
  • Debate different Patristic interpretations of the text through progymnasmata writing exercises of Confirmation and Refutation and oral exercises of the formal dialectic 
  • Find events in the text on geographical maps, and observing the change of maps over time 
  • Locate events in the text on a timeline 
  • Memorize the books of the Bible in canonical order, and know appropriate hermeneutical strategies for the genre of writing being studied  
  • Applying biblical concepts learned in class to real-world situations, so that they will be prepared to apply them to unpredictable situations later in life 
  • Engage in a sustained inquiry into the way to read the Old Testament types and shadows as fulfilled in Christ and the Gospel, as seen in a research paper 
  • Pray these scriptures through the adoption of a habitual practice of morning and evening prayer, modeled on Lectio Divina  
  • The student will academically study the same passages they pray so that God’s Spirit will form both the head and the heart for a lifelong love of God’s Word.  

  

ANCIENT HISTORY 

  • Students will gain an appreciation for the early history of human civilization from creation to the time of Christ with specific attention given to the early history and development of including (but not limited to) Egypt, Assyria, Babylon, Persia, Mede, Greece and Rome.  
  • Students will engage in sustained and disciplined inquiry into these civilizations by doing the following: 
  • Debate different historical interpretations of events through progymnasmata writing exercises of Confirmation and Refutation and oral exercises of formal dialectic 
  • Find events in the text on geographical maps, and observing the change of maps over time 
  • Locate events in the text on a timeline and memorization of Geneva timeline for class 
  • Apply insights from historical research to real world, so they will be prepared to apply them to unpredictable events in life  
  • Explore different fallacies of historians and historiography (selections from David Hackett Fischer’s Historians’ Fallacies) 

Students will spend extended time developing close reading skills in primary source historical material including but not limited to:  

  • The Code of Hammurabi 
  • The Histories, by Herodotus 
  • The Early History of Rome, by Livy 
  • Lives of Noble Greeks and Romans, by Plutarch 
  • The teacher will also draw from resources including but not limited to Jackson Spielvogel’s Western Civilization: A Brief History Vol 1 to 1715. 

 

ANCIENT LITERATURE & COMPOSITION  

  • Students will gain an appreciation for the early literature of human civilization from creation to the time of Christ with specific attention given to (but not limited by) the literature of Egypt, Assyria, Babylon, Persia, Mede, Greece, and Rome.   
  • Students will engage in sustained and disciplined inquiry into the literature of these ancient civilizations by doing the following: 
  • Debate different historical interpretations through progymnasmata writing exercises of Confirmation and Refutation and oral exercises of formal dialectic 
  • Expand their knowledge of writing through the use of exercises from Selby’s Classical Composition, focusing on Encomium, Viturpation, and Comparison 
  • Locate literary events on a historical timeline. 
  • Use experience to interpret texts and apply insights from literature to the real world, so they will be prepared to apply them to unpredictable events later in life  
  • Become familiar with the writing/editing process through a weekly rough draft revision in peer editing sessions and teacher corrections  
  • Imitate good writing at the sentence, paragraph and essay level, separating form from content and adapting the form to new content from the student's own experience 
  • Develop extensive vocabulary and copious writing skills through the use of Erasmus’ writing exercises, and weekly vocabulary games taken from the readings 
  • Memorization of poetry 

Cultivate close reading skills by reading great works of literature in the primary source, including but not limited to:  

  • Selections of Egyptian Literature 
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh and Enuma Elish 
  • Ancient debate poetry 
  • Selections from Hesiod’s Works and Days and Metamorphosis 
  • The Iliad, by Homer 
  • Greek tragedy and comedy 
  • Last Days of Socrates, by Plato 
  • Roman comedy and tragedy 
  • Selections of Greco-Roman poetry 

 

LOGIC 

In the first semester, students are: 

  • Introduced to the process of argumentation and informal fallacies in The Art of Argument, by Aaron Larson of Classical Academic Press   
  • Taught how to solve logical puzzles through extensive use of Alice in Puzzle land by Raymond Smullyan 
  • Taught how to faithfully and logically analyze scripture using Paul’s argument in Romans chapter 12 

In the second semester, students are: 

  • Introduced to the practice of formal dialectical Academic disputation through the unfortunately neglected work of Puritan Isaac Watts and his On the Improvement of the Mind 
  • Given the opportunity to practice public speaking by weekly exercises in debating the class on topics taken from their science, history, literature and bible classes 
  • Given the opportunity to further refine their dialectical and logical skills as they discover problems in the practice of formal disputation 

   

PRE-ALGEBRA 

This course is a transition from the “specific” world of arithmetic to the “general” world of algebra. We use a textbook that teaches with the bar model graphs familiar to them from their Singapore math in the lower grades, as well as more general algebraic methods that prepare them for the upper-level mathematics at Geneva. Students will also be responsible for making presentations explaining mathematical insights to the class, to further develop their public speaking and rhetorical competence. 

Successful students at the end of class will be able to recognize and solve problems using the following mathematical concepts:  

  • Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of negative numbers 
  • Exponents 
  • Place value 
  • Negative numbers and exponents 
  • Roots and radicals 
  • Unknowns and additive inverse 
  • Pythagorean Theorem 
  • Associative and Commutative property 
  • Distributive Property 
  • Multiplicative inverse 
  • Order of operations 
  • Surface area of solids 
  • Transformations of Celsius and Fahrenheit 
  • Absolute Value 
  • Ration and Proportion 
  • Similar Polygons 
  • Least Common Multiple 
  • Greatest Common Factor 
  • Addition and multiplication of polynomials 
  • Volume of a cylinder 
  • Adding and subtracting time, regrouping 
  • Volume of a pyramid and cone 
  • Military time, adding and subtracting 
  • Measurement, adding and subtracting 
  • Irrational numbers 

 

LATIN I 

After this year-long course, the successful student will be able to:  

  • Translate long narratives or passages of beginning or intermediate difficulty 
  • Understand and discuss the history and customs of 1st century Rome 
  • Begin the reading of the Vulgate Bible 
  • Improve the understanding and use of Latin grammar 
  • Take the National Latin Exam 
  • Show mastery of the third declension, third and fourth conjugations, and present, future and perfect passive participles 
  • Competently use Latin grammars and dictionaries 
  • The teacher-developed curriculum draws on Latin in the Christian Trivium, by Gail Busby and Mary Harrington Vol 2 and the Cambridge Latin Series Short Latin Stories 

Teacher-developed curriculum including readings in Latin that will lead to the use of Latin in conversation and writing as well as translation.  Please see Geneva’s "Why Latin?" section for more information on the benefits of learning Latin. 

 

CHOIR  

Introductory Choral Music with the Kodaly method 

Folk songs, hymns, patriotic songs, and Christian holiday works are introduced and practiced 

 

ART: FOUNDATIONS OF ART 

Introduction to the Foundations of Art students will learn about the elements of Art and Principles of Design, including a study in watercolor leaf painting, Audobon inspired colored pencil drawing, graphite self-portrait, Ceramic coil vases, and face mugs. 

Students will also do further studies in the following: 

  • Linoleum Printmaking 
  • Bas relief Tiles 
  • Rose window color wheel painting 
  • Tempara Painting 
  • Acrylic painting 
  • One-point perspective  

PE 

Twice a week with exercises, stretching, and games 

Emphasis on general fitness and cultivating lifelong habits of activity